Sci-tech

Bluehole to release 'PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds' in China

Bluehole to release 'PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds' in China

After months of behind-the-scenes negotiations, Tencent, which just overtook Facebook in terms of market value, announced on Wednesday that it will handle PUBG's publishing rights in China.

PUBG was developed by South Korean company Blue Hole and has shipped over 20M copies since the March launch to become the top-selling game in the world. Specifically, PUBG will have to incorporate tweaks that would make it more suitable for the "socialist core values" of China.

1 of 4PUBG's big 1.0 update is here Image via Bluehole Inc
1 of 4PUBG's big 1.0 update is here Image via Bluehole Inc

With 22 million people around the world owning PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds accounts, having half of the game's players occupy servers that aren't their own local areas affects each game's lag and bullet detection. Chinese tech giant Tencent promised to add "socialist core values" to the game in order to bypass the country's strict censors. Similar "Battle Royale" style games released by Tencent's biggest rival, China-based NetEase Inc., were already given alterations to get through these content checks. Its free mobile games called "Terminator 2" and "Wilderness" are two of the most popular mobile titles in China, and they heavily feature red banners and Chinese government slogans. In addition to striving for massive military reforms and economic expansion, his teachings have caught on as a unique school of thought putting him on the path to becoming potentially as influential as communist founder Mao Zedong.

In turn, it's thought this iteration of PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds will offer "healthy, positive cultural and value guidance, especially for underage users".

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